Saturday, September 20, 2008

10 Steps to Lasting Weight Loss has an interesting list of 10 simple things you can do to lose and maintain your weight loss:


Once upon a time, experts said to stay off the scale—it can be discouraging. But after studying 3,500 individuals from the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR) who've maintained 60 or more pounds of weight loss for at least a year, researchers found that 44 percent weighed themselves daily. Unhealthy obsession? No. They use it as an early warning system for preventing weight regain. If your goal is to keep your weight at a certain level, you have to have feedback to see whether you're successful.


Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York recently determined that simply seeing food can trigger a physiological "feed me" response. In the study, visual food cues caused brain activity to jump by 24 percent—mostly in the orbitofrontal cortex, the area of the brain that is related to drive and acquisition. So a constant barrage of pizza-delivery ads on TV could test your limits. And don't get us started on the Food Network.


Christian men who report feeling greater intimacy with God through prayer are more likely to be physically active than other men, according to research from Cornell University. Studies have shown that those who have more social support move more, and being closer to God may give men that support. Another possible reason: General religion in the United States encompasses theological teachings about the body as a temple, which may also lead to the consumption of a healthier diet and increased physical activity. Amen to that.


Hunger increases healthy men's taste sensitivity to sweet and salty substances. This means vending-machine snacks (which come in two flavors: sweet or salty—coincidence?) will taste even better when you're hungry. You could trust that you'd savor the flavor by eating only a small amount. (Right.) Or you could sidestep this land mine altogether. Eat offensively. Eat regularly during the day to stave off cravings and the bingeing that can result.


Seventy per day, to be exact. That's the number that people in a City of Hope National Medical Center experiment ate daily for 6 months, in conjunction with a reduced-calorie diet, to drop 18 percent of their body weight. Almonds are a nutrient-dense food that provides healthful monounsaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which together contribute to feeling full. Go for whole almonds in their unsalted, raw, or dry-roasted state. Fifteen to 20 will do the trick for a quick snack. Try 50 as a meal replacement.

You can read the rest of the article here.

I think for me one of the most important ones on the list is the "weight yourself often" step. I wrote about it in, "Be a Slave to the Scale.". It's easy to notice that your pants are getting tight or your belly is getting a little bigger but to dismiss and say, "Oh it's only a couple of punds," and before you know it a couple of pounds turns into 20.

If you have a constant reminder of where you are weight wise, you will be able to make the necessary changes to your diet/exercise regime early enough to prevent your weight gain from getting out of hand and having to start again from square one.


Fitness Goddess said...

I think I wiwll give the almond thing a try...